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Wide-angle Perspective

January 22, 2014

By Charlie Badenhop

Your physiology plays a major role in determining your emotional state and how you perceive the world. I have written about this on many occasions. Usually when I write about physiology I emphasize the importance of your breathing and posture, and today I would like to take this concept a bit further by writing about how you and your world change when you slow down and allow yourself to have an open focus, wide angle perspective. When you change the way you attend to life you change your experience of yourself and the world you live in.

Invariably, when you experience stress you feel incapable of cultivating the life experience you deeply desire, and that is much of what stress is all about- Feeling incapable or out of control. When you feel stressed you perceive yourself and the world around you in a tight focus. The tighter your focus, the more you miss out on the many opportunities for change that are all around you. When you are stressed it is like looking at the world through a telephoto lens. A lens that only allows for a narrow field of view and a magnified image of your perceived problem. The tighter your focus the larger your problem appears to be, the more alone you feel, and the less you breathe. The tighter your focus the more the present moment and your potential future gets overwhelmed by your past!

When you change your perspective to open focus-wide angle, you come to realize that you have only been constructing one of many possible realities. Change the way you focus and attend to the world and you will change your reality and your sense of what is possible. Learning and the living of one’s life, is a creative act of self-discovery in which you extract meaning from everything you encounter. You are constantly engaged in the artful and “artificial” synthesis of diverse and paradoxical fragments of “information” into a new integrated whole.

When you are experiencing stress you lose your sense of context (circumstances and setting), proportion (the relationship of one “thing” to another), and scale (the relative size of one “thing” compared to another). The more exaggerated or out of whack these three components of your experience are, the more you will experience anxiety, fear, and stress.

So what to do?

You can change the way you pay attention, which in turn will change what you pay attention to, which in turn will change your perception of what is possible. When your awareness is expansive and wide angle you can achieve a deeper fuller sense of being an active participant in life, an active player in life, an active team member, who is not alone and separate.

You can cultivate the capacity to have a compassionate, composed experience of your life. An experience that is expansive, multidimensional, and multicolor. An experience similar to the many times in your life when you felt great and had the sense that your life really can be all that you have been hoping for.

Slow down your thinking mind by breathing fully, sit up straight, tense and then release various muscle groups throughout your body, place your current challenge in the context of your entire life, and look at your challenge from a distance with the perspective of a wise person. Consider the many resources you have available to you, and the many other times you have overcome challenges. Imagine your have already overcome your challenge, and ask yourself “What did I do to accomplish this?” Let the answer to this question “come to you” slowly over time. You really do have the ability to achieve all you truly desire!

This article was originally published as a musing in Charlie’s biweekly newsletter. Subscribe to the Seishindo newsletter to receive Charlie’s popular biweekly podcasts and musings (lifetools for everyday’s challenges).

his article was originally published as a musing in Charlie’s biweekly newsletter. Subscribe to the Seishindo newsletter to receive Charlie’s popular biweekly podcasts and musings (lifetools for everyday’s challenges).   - See more at: http://embrace-transition.com/2013/12/18/in-the-middle-of-nowhere/#sthash.3AVqfu8W.dpuf

Also by Charlie:

- In the Middle of Nowhere

- Say Yes to Success

- Questions to Ponder

 

About the author: Charlie Badenhop has been working in Japan as a coach and consultant for close to 30 years. His work is based on the principles of Aikido, NLP, Ericksonian Hypnosis, and Noguchi Sei Tai. Charlie is the originator of the human potential discipline of Seishindo. Seishindo is a melding of Western problem solving skills, with Eastern contemplative awareness practices. If you are drawn to better understand the intersection and interaction between your thinking mind and your body, heart, and spirit, then you will likely appreciate Seishindo (http://www.seishindo.org/). Sign up for Charlie's biweekly newsletter via the Seishindo website.
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